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Author Topic: Creating My Own Ps3 Scuf Controller  (Read 530 times)

Bido

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Creating My Own Ps3 Scuf Controller
« on: September 06, 2013, 11:16:00 PM »

Hello so ive been interested in doing my own scuf controller (duplicate x & o) but im not really sure about some stuff and decided to come here for some help. Here is my controller board
(IMG:http://i1080.photobucket.com/albums/j327/xRaNa-/20130830_181953_zpsd289afa0.jpg)

I already searched the thread with all the boards -> http://forums.xbox-scene.com/index.php?showtopic=648322

One of my doubts is i saw some guy video and he said i had to solder both x & o to COM2 point but he used a different board.

And by the way my board says VX6_0.05 and the board on the picture says VX6_0.06 and i was wondering if that affects anything or it just the same as .06 ?
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RDC

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Creating My Own Ps3 Scuf Controller
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2013, 11:30:00 PM »

All of the buttons on the right side of the controller share the COM2 connection, so X, O, /\, [ ], R1 or R2 would all use COM2 for one half of the new button connection, then the other half goes to which ever button you're wanting to duplicate.

The MSU_VX6 part is all you need to go by. If I ever run across any of the remainder of the version number making a difference I'll be sure to post that info up, but so far any changes between that bit of the version number hasn't been significant enough to need any attention.

Just go by the spots shown in the PS3 TP thread for the MSU_VX6 and you'll be good to go. Note that COM2 is TP15 on that board, which is different from the earlier versions where it was TP18 for a long time.
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Bido

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Creating My Own Ps3 Scuf Controller
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2013, 12:05:00 AM »

Thank you so much for all the information and the fast reply RDC, if i go to Radioshack tomorrow il start the soldering thanks again and one more thing if i want to add a LED light do i have to buy a resistor ?
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RDC

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Creating My Own Ps3 Scuf Controller
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2013, 01:25:00 AM »

It depends on the voltage rating of the Resistor and then what power source you'll be using in the controller.

A 2v LED will need a Resistor if the voltage source is anything above it, like 2.5v, but a 3V LED would not need one, and it would also not be as bright as it could be, or depending on the LED just not light up at all.

Also, the LED+ spot on the controller isn't for wiring up LEDs. That's for the player LEDs that are already in the controller. It turns the Grounds on/off to light them up, so that spot should not be used for powering an LED as it is always on.

Typically the power source for the Sticks is used for LEDs, as ti's switched (turns on/off with the controller) and it's 2.8v. That makes TP27 a possible candidate to use for the power source for your LED, but Sony has changed how that whole setup is done on the VX6, and I don't have one here anymore for testing that TP27 theory out. You'd need to use a DMM on it and make sure that it was 2.8v when the controller was on, then 0v when it's off, then it could be used.
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Bido

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Creating My Own Ps3 Scuf Controller
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2013, 08:49:00 PM »

QUOTE(RDC @ Sep 7 2013, 08:25 AM) *

It depends on the voltage rating of the Resistor and then what power source you'll be using in the controller.

A 2v LED will need a Resistor if the voltage source is anything above it, like 2.5v, but a 3V LED would not need one, and it would also not be as bright as it could be, or depending on the LED just not light up at all.

Also, the LED+ spot on the controller isn't for wiring up LEDs. That's for the player LEDs that are already in the controller. It turns the Grounds on/off to light them up, so that spot should not be used for powering an LED as it is always on.

Typically the power source for the Sticks is used for LEDs, as ti's switched (turns on/off with the controller) and it's 2.8v. That makes TP27 a possible candidate to use for the power source for your LED, but Sony has changed how that whole setup is done on the VX6, and I don't have one here anymore for testing that TP27 theory out. You'd need to use a DMM on it and make sure that it was 2.8v when the controller was on, then 0v when it's off, then it could be used.


Update 1, Today i got all i needed buttons,solder and my old soldering iron, went to solder the first point X and the solder wouldnt stick soo i pick up my knife to clean the X point and ended up fu**cking itall the buttons were responding except the X i got soo mad i broke it completely , tomorrow il see if i can go to gamestop and pick up a new ps3 controller lol might aswell pick up a new soldering iron btw could you link me to somewhere with soldering tips? or could you give me sometips with the controller circuit board, i have soldered rapidfire kits to me older controllers with no problems but today i fck up the X point.
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RDC

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Creating My Own Ps3 Scuf Controller
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2013, 10:18:00 PM »

http://forums.xbox-scene.com/index.php?sho...p;#entry3406983

You're not going to get much better without practice. Use the damaged board for trying to prep a via correctly before attempting it on the new one.
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Bido

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Creating My Own Ps3 Scuf Controller
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2020, 08:30:00 PM »

Went to Gamestop to get a new controller, RadioShack to exchange the first tac buttons and HomeDepot to pick up a new Soldering Iron, a X-acto knife and the Lexan plastic.

(IMG:http://i1080.photobucket.com/albums/j327/xRaNa-/20130912_215209_zpsd52c0a6f.jpg)

But before openning i want to make sure how to get the solder to stick to the circuit board, i dont want to mess it up like i did with the last controller and here is a pic about my old soldering iron.

(IMG:http://i1080.photobucket.com/albums/j327/xRaNa-/20130912_224554_zpsbc8a4264.jpg)
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Bido

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Creating My Own Ps3 Scuf Controller
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2020, 02:34:00 AM »

QUOTE(RDC @ Sep 12 2013, 05:18 AM) *

http://forums.xbox-scene.com/index.php?sho...p;#entry3406983

You're not going to get much better without practice. Use the damaged board for trying to prep a via correctly before attempting it on the new one.


Final work.
(IMG:http://i1080.photobucket.com/albums/j327/xRaNa-/7ee96cb6-dc42-4ba3-9f30-b14539caf7b8_zps9d8aaa52.jpg)

Took me some hours to get those wires to stick on the damn points lol but yeah got it to work without breaking the controller now all i want to do is sleep and thanks again RDC.
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RDC

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Creating My Own Ps3 Scuf Controller
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2020, 05:11:00 AM »

Welcome.

Another thing to note for the future. When you glue down your wire on the PCB, it's best to secure it back a little bit from the solder joint for a couple of reasons. If you ever have to redo that wiring or wire something else up there, it's easier with no glue on it, and having the glue right on top of the solder joint doesn't really make it that much more secure than just the solder holding it in place as all the stress from an accidental pull is still all right there at that one spot. Gluing the wire down to the PCB a short distance from the solder joint still gets you access to that spot if it's needed and makes another secure point to hold the wire in place.
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